Friday 19 September 2014

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Runaway Youth: Where Are The Children?

Children Who Runaway 

According to societyandculture.com, more than one million children in the U.S. run away from home each year. Although most runaways are between 15 and 17, kids as young as 10 are among the one in seven who leave their homes. Children most often leave home during the summer months. According to the National Runaway Switchboard, most runaways stay with a friend or relative.

Children often run away for a number of reasons, from escaping an abusive home life to meeting someone in person they made contact with online. Once on the streets, they often face many serious circumstances. Some resort to prostitution or drug dealing to get by. Drug abuse is common among runaway children.  

Runaway children targeted by human traffickers

Published by FOX 25 / MyFoxBoston.com: Thursday, 17 Nov 2011, 10:25 PM EST

The case of a Wayland middle school student, who was missing for more than ten days and found in a 42-year-old New Jersey man’s home, is disturbing.

The man, identified as Jorge Luis Garzon, is facing a series of charges, including sexual assault. The website NJ.com, citing sources, is reporting the 13-year-old Wayland girl met Garzon online.

FOX25 is no longer identifying the Wayland teenager because of the charges in the case.

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), as many as 800,000 children are reported missing in the United States every year. Most are recovered. But many become victims of homicide and sexual abuse.

FOX25′s Bob Ward recently spoke with Tom Shamshak, a noted local private investigator who is also a consultant for NCMEC, about the scope of this huge problem of endangered children.

“They become vulnerable, they are at the mercy of the streets,” says Shamsak, “Human traffickers are able to identify the non-verbal behavior of somebody that’s out of place.”

Shamsak says human traffickers target these young people, and force them into prostitution. He calls it a major societal issue.

Runaways often leave their homes to meet up with someone they’ve communicated with on the Internet through social media websites. Experts say the best way parents can protect their child from predators on the Internet is to become computer literate themselves.

Check our clearinghouse on Black and Missing Foundation, Inc’s website to see a profile on Bryant Scott Ayers.

2 comments

  • Bau Bau Nance | January 10, 2012 at 8:35 am | Reply

    When you remove a missing person from your site, why don’t you explain why the person was removed? Was the person found; if so, were the dead or alive? Was it a runaway who wasn’t really missing, in the normal sense? Why were they dropped from your site, when they are not listed in your “solved” cases?

  • ms adair | January 24, 2012 at 8:54 pm | Reply

    I just want to help

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